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Paul Klee in 1911 photographed by Alexander Eliasberg
Around the fish (1929)

Paul Klee

18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940

Paul Klee was born in Switzerland. During the course of his career, he not only participated in various art movements, but he was also one of the leading forces in many of these movements. Some of the forms he worked on during his career include expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. During the later portion of his career, he also worked as an art instructor for some time, prior to the Nazi rule removing him from his post; at this point, he and his family fled Germany, and went back to Switzerland, where Paul Klee remained until he died several years later.

Jung Yeon Min

Jung Yeon Min’s works are highly imaginative and rich. One finds multiple worlds, the extraordinary and the realistic, notions of micro and macro, and manipulations of space and time in her work. Specifically, her work offers two equal but divergent investigations. On the one hand, she envisions and explores a mysterious and fantastical world. In a separate but concurrent investigation, she examines the effect of time in the pictorial realm. Sometimes colliding, these two points of inquiry form an intriguing basis for a closer reading of Min’s works as opening up places of potential and possibility.

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Artwork of the week #27
by Labra from “Fiber Futures”
Fiber Futures exhibition at Design museum of Helsinki displayed contemporary Japanese textile art. The exhibition was co-organized with Japan Society, New York, International Textile Network Japan, and Tama Art University Museum. The identity draws its inspiration from Japanese aesthetics. Art work detail is from Yasako Iyana’s Umi kara no okurimonos art work that was part of the exhibition.
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Artwork of the week #27

by Labra from “Fiber Futures

Fiber Futures exhibition at Design museum of Helsinki displayed contemporary Japanese textile art. The exhibition was co-organized with Japan Society, New York, International Textile Network Japan, and Tama Art University Museum. The identity draws its inspiration from Japanese aesthetics. Art work detail is from Yasako Iyana’s Umi kara no okurimonos art work that was part of the exhibition.

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Dino Valls

oil paintings

The naked girl he repeatedly paints is old enough to be sexually active, but she’s simultaneously virginal and vulnerable, young enough to be a child.

Red lids frame her blue eyes, as if she has wept herself to silence; her lips often appear to be bruised, as if she has a young lover whose kisses have been too forceful. Labels stuck to the skin of her breast compare her nipple to a wasp, implying the sting. Her body is alternately covered and revealed by cloth, intimate. In some of the paintings she’s disturbingly tied or wrapped, even suspended; in one instance, Sigilla, she’s bound with cords sealed with wax like a medieval letter. Disembodied hands, men’s hands, manipulate her naked body.